bondage

The Tennessean reports:

Tennessee lawmakers approved another condemnation of Sex Week at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, but even this latest measure may not be the final word on the controversy.

The state Senate passed a resolution 23-6 Thursday morning that criticizes the university for allowing the six-day series of lectures, games and other events meant to promote discussion about sexuality. The resolution also lays out new rules for distributing student activity fees, a portion of which was used to fund the event…

The new rules under consideration could allow students to withhold their mandatory activity fees from funding controversial events.

Legal Insurrection reports some of the details from last year’s Sex Week at UT:

One of the items that the student reporter failed to note was that akey host of the event is porn actress Tristan Taormino. The starlet will hold a Q+A session, a class titled “Get Wet: Exploring the Connections Between Sexual Pleasure, Health, & Advocacy” and another called “We Can’t Stop: Orgasms and Masturbation”. Her body of work includes “Tristan Taormino’s Guide to Bondage for Couples.

As you can see, UT’s Sex Week goes well beyond “promoting discussion about sexuality,” as the Tennessean would have you believe.

Sounds more like they are promoting a very specific sexual agenda–one put forward by the corporate, for-profit sex industry.

(Image: Micio_.Flickr1)

{ 0 comments }

An event held at the University of Michigan on Wednesday night taught students how to be kinky and engage in Bondage, Dominance, Sadism and Masochism.

“Thinking of getting acquainted with kink, or curious about BDSM?” states a description of the event on the university’s website. “Start here to learn about safety, communication, and other tips. Participants will learn about basic BDSM concepts and how to safely and respectfully navigate new experiences.”

The event, titled “Kink For Beginners,” is part of the public university’s “Sexpertise” three-day observance, which aims to teach students about sexual health, organizers say.

Fifty-eight students signed up for the BDSM workshop, according to the university’s website.

In addition to the kink workshop, Sexpertise events held Wednesday night also included “Finding Pleasure” and “Sexy Supplies!”

The supplies workshop was led by the owner of a local adult-pleasure shop called Ann Arbor’s S3 Safe Sex Store and was described online as a way for students to explore their pleasure and sexual health and learn how to use sex toys.

Click here to read the university’s full list of Sexpertise events, which also included educational lectures and discussions about the LGBTQ community.

All events were free, open to the public, and led by “researchers, inspiring community members and talented U-M peer educators,” the University of Michigan’s website states.

IMAGE: Micio/Flickr

{ 0 comments }

Three new books published by academic presses use lofty intellectual theories to describe strange deviant sex (kink, bondage, and erotic masochism) as if it were the most normal thing in the world. Camile Paglia has reviewed the books for The Chronicle for Higher Education. It’s not pretty:

Gender-theory groupthink leads to bizarre formulations such as this, from Weiss’s introduction: “SM performances are deeply tied to capitalist cultural formations.” The preposterousness of that would have been obvious had Weiss ever dipped into the voluminous works of the Marquis de Sade, one of the most original and important writers of the past three centuries and a pivotal influence on Nietzsche. But incredibly, none of the three authors under review seem to have read a page of Sade. It is scandalous that the slick, game-playing Foucault (whose attempt to rival Nietzsche was an abysmal failure) has completely supplanted Sade, a mammoth cultural presence in the 1960s via Grove Press paperbacks that reprinted Simone de Beauvoir’s seminal essay, “Must We Burn Sade?”

Weiss is so busy with superfluous citations that she ignores what her interviewees actually tell her when it doesn’t fit her a priori system. Thus any references to religion or spirituality are passed by without comment. She also refuses to consider or inquire about any psychological aspect to her subjects’ sexual proclivities, no matter how much pain is inflicted or suffered. She declares that she rejects the “etiological approach”: Any search for “the causation of or motivation for BDSM desires” would mean that “marginalized sexualities” must be “explained and diagnosed as individual deviations.” To avoid any ripple in the smooth surface of liberal tolerance, therefore, flogging, cutting, branding, and the rest of the menu of consensual torture must be assumed to be meaning-free—no different than taking your coffee with cream or without. (These books approvingly quote BDSM players comparing what they do to extreme but blatantly nonsexual sports like rock climbing and sky diving.) Weiss’s neutrality here would be more palatable if she were indeed merely recording or chronicling, but her own biases are palpably invested in her avoidance of religion and her moralistic stands on economics.

Read the full review here.

Click here to Like The College Fix on Facebook  / Twitter: @CollegeFix

{ 0 comments }

Via Campus Reform:

Harvard University granted a controversial BDSM sex-club official school recognition on Wednesday, Campus Reform has confirmed.

The student club, Harvard College Munch, is a group of roughly 20 members that meets weekly to explicitly discuss matters related to BDSM and other forms of kinky sex.

School recognition will allow the club to apply for university funding and promote their group on school property, reports Harvard’s student newspaper, The Crimson

In an article published earlier this year, students in the group spoke freely about fantasies of rape, forced feeding, and impersonating animals during sex…

Read the full story here.

If you ask us, it sounds like Harvard is behind the curve here. After all, this kind of stuff has been going on at Yale for years.

Click here to Like The College Fix on Facebook.

 

{ 2 comments }