Conn.

Eric Owens at The Daily Caller pieced together the latest on the shocking emerging story of the Yale University professor who died recently after a night in jail:

Last weekend, Yale University English professor Samuel See died in a New Haven, Conn., jail cell.

He was gay and had an estranged husband, Sunder Ganglani. See and Ganglani were wed in May. However, marital bliss quickly turned sour. By September, a court had entered orders of protection against both men to stay away from each other.

The Yale prof also seems to have marketed male escort services and webcam modeling on at least four different websites under the name “Ryan Cochran.”

… “I love sex and being with men,” the profile description of Ryan Cochran, “elite escort,” enthuses. “I can get into all kinds of sexual and social situations —  just name your pleasure. I’m down to earth, humble, personally generous, and horny a lot of the time.”

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Via Lisa Barron of Newsmax:

Florida Atlantic University President Mary Jane Saunders has resigned in the wake of students being asked to stomp on Jesus’ name.

The school announced that she resigned late Tuesday and that FAU Board of Trustees Chairman Anthony Barbar had accepted the resignation. Saunders will remain at FAU to take a faculty position, where she will be assigned a special research project to assess the feasibility of developing a physician’s assistant program at the university.

During the course of the past year, Saunders defended a professor who asked students to stomp on a paper after writing the name “Jesus” on it and a failed attempt to name the football stadium after jail contractor Geo Group. Another FAU professor made news when he suggested the Newtown, Conn., shooting in which 20 schoolchildren were killed never took place.

“There is no doubt the recent controversies have been significant and distracting to all members of the university community,” Saunders wrote in her resignation letter, according to an excerpt posted on the school’s website.

“The issues and the fiercely negative media coverage have forced me to reassess my position as the president of FAU. I must make choices that are the best for the university, me and my family,” she said.

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In the “People’s Republic of Boulder,” by City Council decree, residents are known as “pet guardians,” and now they’ve stretched their roles to guardians of wild life as well.

On Sunday, about 50 people gathered at Pearl Street Mall for a candlelight vigil to demand justice for an adult, male elk shot by a police officer in a suburban Boulder neighborhood on New Year’s Day.

To honor the elk, participants played recordings of elk bugling from their cell phones. They passed out flyers to passersby. They vowed to mount pressure on police as the investigation continues. In addition to the vigil, a silent march took place recently as well.

Since the shooting, town meetings have been held. The chief of police has made statements. An announcement from the district attorney on whether charges will be filed against the police officer, who reportedly failed to handle the situation by the book, is expected today.

Meanwhile, in interviews with The College Fix, some CU Boulder students offered a different perspective, calling the reactions a bit much, even insulting.

Junior Taylor Lane, 20, said she thought the vigil was “extreme.”

“So many people in Boulder are concerned with our ecological, or ethical, facade and this is a perfect example,” she said. “One animal was shot out of season. I’m certain more than that are hit by traffic on a daily basis.”

What’s more, the Boulder community did not hold a vigil for the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in Newtown, Conn., in mid-December, in which a classroom of young students were gunned down by a mentally unstable gunman.

Senior Mitchell Whitus, 20, said he feels the Boulder community reacted “to the wrong thing.”

“I saw a report on Channel 4 about the vigil, and a lady who was there compared the shooting of the elk to the Sandy Hook shooting,” he said. “I’m appalled that they would compare the shooting to the massacre of children. Why not hold a vigil for the Sandy Hook shooting, instead? It is crazy.”

Nearly half of Boulder’s residents are registered Democrats, and the city is widely understood as the home of “pet guardians” and environmentalists.

Nevertheless, their reaction to the elk shooting also runs in stark contrast to the lack of any uproar over a bear that was tranquilized on the CU Boulder campus last year, then found dead after being hit by a car.

Meanwhile, other students felt the Boulder community used the elk as a symbol to gather around, but failed to hit on the bigger question of the police officer’s conduct in shooting the beloved creature.

Senior Elizabeth Coombs, 22, said the elk is the wrong target.

“I think we should focus on the potential abuse of power by the officer if he was, indeed, on duty when he shot the elk,” she said.

Fix contributor Aslinn Scott is a student at CU Boulder.

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IMAGE: Odolaigh/Flickr

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