ObamaCare

After more videos came forth of Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber pretty much putting his foot in his mouth, two universities took swift action in “rectifying” the situation.

The first, the University of Pennsylvania, took down a 2013 panel discussion featuring Gruber back on November 10. They put it back up, however, fairly quickly.

Last Monday, the University of Rhode Island removed their own Gruber video, “a 2012 discussion where Gruber explains how the law was passed to ‘exploit’ the American voters’ ‘lack of economic understanding.’”

Dave LaVallee, assistant communications director at the school, initially told National Review Online that the university was “currently investigating” why the video was deleted.

On Friday, URI posted the following explanation:

On Monday, November 17, the Associated Press – Broadcast News Center requested clearance to use a video of a lecture presented by MIT Professor of Economics Jonathan Gruber at the University of Rhode Island on October 30, 2012, as part of its Honors Colloquium series. The speakers in the series, or their representatives, require the University to sign contracts that specify distribution approvals and/or language relating to their presentations including the posting of videos to the University’s website. In reviewing the Gruber contract before responding to the AP request, it was clear that the University needed written permission to post the lecture to its website. The University, therefore, immediately removed the lecture from its website and contacted the agency holding the copyright of Professor Gruber’s lecture to secure permission to repost. The agency will not provide its consent to the University to repost the video.

Interesting how the contract/permissions issue didn’t seem to be much of a concern before last Monday.

h/t to Douglas Ernst.

Like The College Fix on Facebook / Follow us on Twitter

The Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia will hear oral argument tomorrow morning in Geneva College v. Burwell, one of the cases brought by religious employers seeking to get out of Obamacare’s mandate to provide abortion pills and other birth control they object to on religious grounds.

The Alliance Defending Freedom, which is representing the Presbyterian college in Pennsylvania, said Tuesday the school “simply wants to abide by the Christian faith it espouses and teaches.”

A lower court halted enforcement of the mandate on Geneva’s student and employee health plans last year. For background on the case, see the alliance’s fact sheet.

Read the press release.

Like The College Fix on Facebook / Follow us on Twitter

IMAGE: American Life League/Flickr

The name Richard Weinstein has been mentioned quite a bit over the last few weeks on television and radio. How come? Very simple: Because Rich has proven yet again that an average joe can do what the mainstream media can’t … or, more accurately, won’t.

I’ve known Rich since our college days, with one enduring memory being us (with several other friends) battling traffic on I-95 en route to the old Spectrum in Philly — to see the band Yes on their “comeback” 90125 tour. (Anyone remember “Owner of a Lonely Heart”?) He’s an incredibly bright — and funny — guy, and he’s quite stupefied by all the attention he’s been getting.

That’s because, again, he can’t believe no one in the media — or, at least someone with more time and resources than he — didn’t find the (damning) videos of Obamacare architect (and MIT professor) Jonathan Gruber way before he did.

1) What’s your background?
I’m an investment advisor and financial planner her in the Philly area. I own a small business and work out of my house. Nothing sensational. Just kind of a regular guy. Have two kids, two dogs, two cats. Big lacrosse fan. Not much different than anyone else.

I have an accounting degree and MBA, and I also got my CFP certification. So, I have a pretty strong academic background.

2) How did you become interested in the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare)?
I’m pretty much an outsider to the law just like everyone else. My insurance got cancelled and I had to go find a new plan. I was kind of irritated because the president said without qualifiers that “If I liked my plan…” So, I though the law wouldn’t impact me- probably just like everyone else that heard that. So when I lost my plan, I started paying attention. The Admin clearly wasn’t telling the truth and the media was cheerleading. I saw these Architect people getting on the air and figured maybe they left a paper trail. Its not a paper trail but boy oh boy…

3) What has been the reaction by mainstream media types when you bring up what you discovered?
Most tell me that they don’t have the staff to get into the weeds like I did. It’s kind of disappointing actually. I get the feeling they all kind of knew this stuff was going on but nobody could really get the “money shot.”

4) Now that many of these videos have gone viral, what’s been the reaction by the media (as a whole)?
I think there were two in July and there are probably three more from this week. The media is really on to it and to me now. Funny, but nobody from the NBC, CBS or ABC has called. Mostly Fox, CNN and some Internet outlets. Everyone wants the next bomb shell. But people are catching up… and that’s good. The Daily Caller got an excellent video today that I had but I think it was being held back by a major network to make a big splash tonight. They got beaten to the punch a bit.

5) So far, what’s the “biggest” name to reach out to you?
You want me to name drop? Jake Tapper, Neil Cavuto, “Fox and Friends.” Sorry, lost my train of thought as I literally just got a call from Byron York.

I’ve turned down four on-camera interviews so far. My face should not be on the poster of what’s going on right now. Dr. Gruber’s face should be. Plus, I have a face for radio.

6) You mentioned on a recent radio appearance that you have some more video discoveries. Can you give us a little teaser as to what they’re about?
For now, I’m concerned about trying to get people to drink out of a fire hose. I have soooo much. I’ve been on this for a year. If I go too fast people’s eyes will glaze over. So, for now I think focusing on the “stupid” videos is pretty strong. But there’s much more and I guarantee the American people are going to be angry.

7) In your opinion, what will be the ultimate fate of ObamaCare what with the new Republican Senate and the upcoming Supreme Court case?
That’s a good question. But that’s kind of a policy question and I’m trying to stay away from those issues. I just want the American people to know what’s out there and make their own decisions. What happens to the ACA is not in my hands. Either the Supreme Court will decide on the Halbig/King/Pruitt cases, or the Congress will figure out how to work on this.

**********

Most recently this past Wednesday, Rich was a featured guest of Philadelphia radio host Chris Stigall alongside — wait for it! — Sharyl Attkisson at the Philadelphia-adjacent Newtown Theatre. Check out the audio from the event.

Dave Huber is an assistant editor of  The College Fix. (@ColossusRhodey)

Like The College Fix on Facebook / Follow us on Twitter

IMAGE: YouTube screencap of Glenn Reynolds’ (Instapundit) book An Army of Davids.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist Jonathan Gruber was recorded on video months ago stating “‘the stupidity of the American voter’ made it important for him and Democrats to hide Obamacare’s true costs from the public.”

Saying he’d “rather have this law than not,” Gruber noted keeping the costs hidden was “really, really critical for the thing to pass.”

Forbes reports:

The guy dubbed the “Obamacare architect” is a viral YouTube sensation. A few months back, he was caught on tape admitting that Obamacare doesn’t provide subsidies for federally-run insurance exchanges; it’s now the topic of a new case before the Supreme Court. Today, new video surfaced in which Gruber said that “the stupidity of the American voter” made it important for him and Democrats to hide Obamacare’s true costs from the public. “That was really, really critical for the thing to pass,” said Gruber. “But I’d rather have this law than not.” In other words, the ends—imposing Obamacare upon the public—justified the means.

The new Gruber comments come from a panel discussion that he joined on October 17, 2013 at the University of Pennsylvania’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. He was joined on the panel by Penn health economist Mark Pauly. Patrick Howley of the Daily Caller was the first to flag Gruber’s remarks.

In fairness to Gruber, American voters are not the only people whose intelligence he questions; elsewhere in the discussion, he describes New York Sen. Chuck Schumer (D.) as someone who “as far as I can tell, doesn’t understand economics” and calls a staffer for Sen. Olympia Snowe (R., Maine)—presumably William Pewen—an “idiot.”

Earlier today, Gruber attempted to walk back his remarks, saying he was speaking “off the cuff” and dubbed his comments “inappropriate”:

Read the full Forbes article and The Corner post.

Like The College Fix on Facebook / Follow us on Twitter

IMAGE: YouTube screencap

Since the launch of Obamacare, more than 200 colleges and universities across the nation have cut student and faculty work hours to skirt the federal law’s mandate requiring employers to provide health insurance for people who work 30 hours or more per week.

At last count: 207 campuses.

Those who have seen their paychecks shrink as a result of the Affordable Care Act include students who work on campus at restaurants, bookstores or gyms, teaching assistants, Residence Advisers, officer workers, student journalists, and a variety of other workers, such as part-time maintenance crews and groundskeepers. Educators’ work hours have also been cut due to the mandate, including part-time instructors and adjunct professors.

The College Fix – which first posted a list of campuses negatively impacted by Obamacare last month – will continue to add to this tally each time we learn of a new campus affected by the federal law, an expected turn of events when the employer mandate kicks in. Please alert The College Fix of campuses forced to cut hours because of Obamacare. Please also see our corresponding article detailing the ramifications of these cuts.

Note this is a conservative estimate – not comprehensive list – of campuses that have cut employees’ work opportunities as a result of the Affordable Care Act.

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES HIT BY OBAMACARE: 

1. Middle Tennessee State University – Capped work hours for students, adjunct faculty, graduate assistants and resident assistants

2. North Carolina State UniversityCapped student work hours and adjunct hours

3. Kansas UniversityCapped student work hours at 29 per week

4. Southern Polytechnic State University (Georgia) – Capped student work hours at 20 and capped adjunct hours

5. McNeese State University (Louisiana) – Capped student work hours at 29 per week

6. University of Colorado – Colorado Springs –  Capped student work hours at 25 per week

7. Wright State University (Ohio) – Capped student work hours at 28 per week

8. Georgia Institute of TechnologyCapped student and temp employee work hours at 25 per week and capped adjunct hours

9. Cinncinatti State Technical & Community CollegeCapped hours for part-timers and hours for adjuncts

10. Technical College System of GeorgiaCapped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

11. South Dakota State UniversityCapped student work hours at 29 per week

12. Arkansas Tech UniversityCapped student work hours at 28 per week

13. Kennesaw State University (Georgia) – Capped teaching loads for part-time faculty

14. Butler Community College (Kansas) – Capped hours for students and part time workers at 28 per week and cut adjunct hours

15. Lakeland College (Wisconsin) – Capped summer work hours for students at 29 per week

16. Colorado Mountain CollegeCapped hours of adjunct faculty at 29 per week

17. Grand Rapids Community College (Michigan) – Capped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

18. Mississippi State UniversityCapped hours for student workers at 28 per week

19. La Sierra University (California) – Capped student work hours at 25 per week

20. El Paso Community College (Texas) – Capped teaching loads for part-time faculty

21. University of Northern IowaPlanned cap to student work hours at 20 per week

22. Lone Star College SystemCapped teaching-load for part-time faculty

23. Western Michigan UniversityCapped student work hours at 25 per week

24. St. Edward’s University (Texas) – Capped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

25. Christendom University (Virginia) – Capped hours for students at 29 per week

26. Flathead Valley Community College (Montana) – Capped adjunct faculty teaching hours

27. Penn State UniversityCapped campus work hours, capped adjunct teaching loads

28. University of Central MissouriCapped hours for part-time workers and adjuncts at 29 per week

29. Murray State University (Kentucky) – Capped adjunct teaching loads

30. University of San FranciscoCapped student work hours at 20 per week

31. Carroll Community College (Maryland) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

32. Community College of Baltimore County (Maryland) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

33. Clemson University (South Carolina) – Capped student workers at 28 hours per week

34. Oakton Community College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty hours at 27 per week

35. Biola University (California) – Planned cap to student work hours at 25 per week

36. Sam Houston State University (Texas) – Capped student work hours at 29 per week

37. Eastern Florida State CollegeCapped hours of part-time employees at 28 per week

38. Mid-Plains Community College (Nebraska) – Capped hours of adjunct faculty, other workers at 28 per week

39. Arizona State UniversityCapped hours of associate faculty members

40. Finger Lakes Community College (New York) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

41. Southern Illinois UniversityCapped graduate teaching assistants at 20 hours per week

42. Georgia Military CollegeCapped hours of adjunct faculty to 29 per week

43. Ball State University (Indiana) – Capped work hours for graduate assistants

44. Forsyth Technical Community College (North Carolina) – Capped hours for adjunct faculty at 29 per week

45. Wilkes Community College (North Carolina) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

46. Philadelphia UniversityCapped hours for adjunct faculty at 29 per week

47. Three Rivers CollegeCapped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

48. Bergen Community College (New Jersey) – Capped adjunct faculty hours

49. Ozarks Technical Community College (Missouri) – Capped part-time faculty work hours at 24 per week

50. University of AlabamaCapped student work hours at 20 per week

51. Hillsborough Community College (Florida) – Capped part-time faculty work hours

52. St. Petersburgh College (Florida) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 27 per week

53. Central Michigan UniversityCapped student work hours at 25 per week

54. University of North AlabamaCapped student work hours at 29 per week

55. Pulaski Technical CollegeCapped work hours for adjunct faculty

56. San Diego Community College DistrictCapped student work hours at 25 per week

57. Drury University (Missouri) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours

58. Cumberland University (Tennessee) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 27 per week

59. Auburn University (Alabama) – Capped student work hours at 20 per week

60. Palm Beach State College (Florida) – Capped hours for 100 part-time faculty at 27.5 per week

61. Santa Fe College (Florida) – Capped part-time faculty hours at 27.5 per week

62. Tallahassee Community College (Florida) – Capped part-time work hours at 24 per week

63. Parkland College (Illinois) – Capped hours for part-time, non-teaching workers at 27.5 per week

64. Indiana UniversityCapped hours for part-timers at 29 per week

65. Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty at 29 per week

66. Howard Community College (Maryland) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty

67. Spartanburg Community College (South Carolina) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

68. Southern Utah UniversityCapped student work hours at 20 per week and capped adjunct teaching loads

69. Arkansas State UniversityCapped student, adjunct faculty, and part-time work hours at 28 per week

70. Texas Christian UniversityCapped student, adjunct faculty, and part-time work hours at 29 per week

71. Des Moines Area CommunityCollege Capped sadjunct faculty summer hours

72. Maricopa Community Colleges (Arizona) – Capped adjunct faculty and part-time work hours at 29 per week

73. University of ArizonaCapped work hours for temporary employees

74. College of DuPage (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty course loads

75. McHenry County College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 24 per week

76. Sinclair Community College (Ohio) – Capped part-time work hours at 28 per week and cut adjunct faculty hours

77. Dallas County Community College DistrictCapped adjunct faculty work hours

78. New Mexico State UniversityCapped graduate-student work hours at 25 per week

79. Blue Ridge Community and Technical College (West Virginia) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

80. Ohio State UniversityCapped student work hours at 28 per week

81. Ohio UniversityCapped student and graduate assistant work hours at 28 hours of work per week during summer

82. Union County College (New Jersey) – Capped adjunct faculty teaching loads

83. Daytona State College (Florida) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty

84. Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

85. Kalamazoo Valley Community College (Michigan) – Capped part-time faculty work hours

86. St. Clair Community College (Michigan) – Capped adjunct professors and part-time work hours at 29 per week

87. Moberly Area Community College (Missouri) – Capped adjunct faculty course loads

88. Community College System of New HampshireCapped adjunct faculty work hours at 27 per week

89. Cuyahoga Community College (Ohio) – Capped part-time work hours at 20 per week

90. University of Akron (Ohio) – Capped course loads for part-time faculty

91. Brigham Young University (Utah) – Capped work hours for students and part-time workers at 29 per week

92. Elmhurst College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct teaching load at one course per semester

93. Columbus State Community College (Ohio) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

94. Joliet Junior College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty course loads

95. Hudson Valley Community College (New York) – Capped part-time faculty work hours

96. Baldwin-Wallace University (Ohio) – Capped course load of adjunct faculty

97. Kent State University (Ohio) – Capped course load of adjunct faculty

98. Lakeland Community College (Ohio) – Capped course load of adjunct faculty

99. Bowling Green State University (Ohio) – Capped part-time work hours at 24 per week and student work hours at 28

100. Shawnee State University (Ohio) – Capped teaching hours for adjunct faculty

101. Virginia TechCapped work hours for part-timer and adjunct faculty at 29 per week

102. Miami Dade College (Florida) – Capped part-time work hours at 25 per week

103. Christopher Newport University (Virginia) – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

104. College of William & Mary (Virginia) – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

105. Norfolk State University (Virginia) – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

106. Virginia Commonwealth University – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

107. George Mason University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

108. James Madison University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

109. Longwood University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

110. Old Dominion University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

111. Radford University (Virginia) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty

112. University of Mary Washington (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

113. Utah Valley UniversityCapped part-time workers at 28 hours per week and capped adjunct teaching loads

114. Illinois Valley Community CollegeCapped part-time work hours at 29 per week

115. Rock Valley College (Illinois) – Capped part-time work hours at 25 per week

116. Chesapeake College (Maryland) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 28 per week

117. Kean University (New Jersey) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours

118. Stark State College (Ohio) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

119. Youngstown State University (Ohio) – Capped work hours of part-time and adjunct faculty

120. Community College of Allegheny College (Pennsylvania) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty and other part-time workers

121. University of Colorado, BoulderCapped student work hours at 25 per week.

122. Adirondack Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

123. University at Albany (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

124. Alfred State College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

125. NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

126. Binghamton University (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

127. State University College at Brockport (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

128. SUNY Broome Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

129. Buffalo State College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

130. University at Buffalo (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

131. College of Technology at Canton (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

132. Cayuga Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

133. Clinton Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

134. College of Agriculture & Technology Cobleskill (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

135. Columbia-Greene Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

136. NYS College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at Cornell University (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

137. NYS College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

138. NYS College of Human Ecology at Cornell (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

139. NYS School of Industrial & Labor Relations at Cornell (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

140. Corning Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

141. State University College at Cortland (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

142. College of Technology at Delhi (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

143. SUNY Medical Center (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

144. Dutchess Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

145. Empire State College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

146. College of Environmental Science and Forestry (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

147. Erie Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

148. Farmingdale State College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

149. Fashion Institute of Technology (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

150. State University College at Fredonia (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

151. Fulton-Montgomery Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

152. Genesee Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

153. State University College at Geneseo (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

154. Herkimer County Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

155. Jamestown Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

156. Jefferson Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

157. Maritime College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week

158. Mohawk Valley Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

159. Monroe Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

160. Morrisville State College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

161. Nassau Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

162. State University College at New Paltz (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

163. Niagara County Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

164. North Country Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

165. State University College at Old Westbury (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

166. State University College at Oneonta (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

167. Onondaga Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

168. College of Optometry (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

169. Orange County Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

170. State University College at Oswego (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

171. State University College at Plattsburgh (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

172. State University College at Potsdam (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

173. State University College at Purchase (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

174. Rockland Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

175. Schenectady Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

176. Stony Brook University (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

177. Suffolk County Community College (new York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

178. Sullivan County Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

179. SUNY Polytechnic Institute (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

180. Tompkins Cortland Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

181. Ulster County Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

182. Upstate Medical University (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

183. Westchester Community College (New York) – Capped student assistant work hours at 29 per week.

184. The College of Central Florida – Capped adjunct faculty teaching hours at 6 credit hours per semester.

185. Blue Ridge Community College (Virginia) –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

186. Central Virginia Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

187. Dabney S. Lancaster Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

188.Danville Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

189. Eastern Shore Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

190. Germanna Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

191. J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

192. John Tyler Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

193. Lord Fairfax Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

194. Mountain Empire Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

195. New River Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

196. Northern Virginia Community College  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

197. Patrick Henry Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

198. Paul D. Camp Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

199. Piedmont Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

200. Rappahannock Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

201. Southside Virginia Community College  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

202. Southwest Virginia Community College  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

203. Thomas Nelson Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

204. Tidewater Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

205. Virginia Highlands Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

206. Virginia Western Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

207. Wytheville Community College (Virginia)  –  Capped adjunct faculty and part-time employees work hours at 29 per week

Please contact us for additions or corrections.

Like The College Fix on Facebook / Follow us on Twitter

College Fix reporter Derek Draplin, a student at the University of Michigan, helped compile this report.

IMAGE: Dr. Fourouk/Flickr

Two Christian universities in Indiana and a Christian education group representing more than a hundred Christian colleges are suing the Obama administration for forcing them to cover abortion drugs in their healthcare plans.

The Alliance Defending Freedom filed the suit on behalf of Taylor University and Indiana Wesleyan; the Association of Christian Schools International, whose college members include Asuza Pacific University and Biola in California and Liberty University in Virginia; and Samaritan Ministries International, which says it provides “a Biblical, non-insurance approach to health care needs.”

The alliance said in a press release:

The recent rule changes issued by the administration for the abortion-pill mandate do not address the religious objections to coerced participation in providing life-ending drugs, devices, and counseling. …

“The government should not force religious organizations to be involved in providing abortion pills to their employees,” said ADF Senior Counsel Gregory S. Baylor. “The best way to respect everyone’s freedom would have been to extend the existing religious exemption to religious non-profits in addition to churches.”

The suit explains:

It can be conceded for argument’s sake that all these requirements advance to some degree the government’s broad interests in public health and equality. But it cannot be plausibly maintained that the fate of the entire enterprise rests in any measurable way on forcing these four Plaintiffs to facilitate access to four drugs and devices—which represent one-fifth of one of the 143 required items—particularly when they are willing to facilitate access to other drugs, devices, and procedures that prevent pregnancy. Moreover, the explicit rationale behind the contraceptive mandate (“Mandate”) was not nebulous aspirations like “public health” and “equality,” but something far more concrete and measurable—the reduction in the adverse health effects associated with the pregnancies that are unintended. The available evidence overwhelmingly shows that contraceptive mandates simply do not reduce unintended pregnancy rates.

Read the alliance press release.

Like The College Fix on Facebook / Follow us on Twitter

IMAGE: Public domain