ObamaCare

Since the launch of Obamacare, at least 122 colleges and universities across the nation have cut student and faculty work hours to skirt the federal law’s mandate requiring employers to provide healthcare for people who work 30 hours or more per week.

Those who have seen their paychecks shrink as a result of the Affordable Care Act include students who work on campus at restaurants, bookstores or gyms, teaching assistants, Residence Advisers, officer workers, student journalists, and a variety of other workers, such as part-time maintenance crews and groundskeepers. Educators’ work hours have also been cut due to the mandate, including part-time instructors and adjunct professors.

A long and growing list of 450 companies, school districts, colleges and institutions that have slashed and capped work hours to comply with the employer mandate – which goes into effect next year – has been compiled by Jed Graham of Investor’s Business Daily, whose tally chronicles employers both public and private.

With permission from Graham, The College Fix extracted the colleges and universities currently cited on his list to create a unique tally that shows the impact of Obamacare on campuses nationwide.

The College Fix will continue to add to this list each time we learn of a new campus affected by the federal law, an expected turn of events when the employer mandate kicks in. Please alert The College Fix of campuses forced to cut hours because of Obamacare.

Please also see our corresponding article detailing the ramifications of these cuts by University of Michigan student Derek Draplin, a College Fix reporter who interviewed Graham and others about the law’s negative impacts. Graham noted the list is a conservative – not comprehensive – tally.

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES HIT BY OBAMACARE:

1. Middle Tennessee State University – Capped work hours for students, adjunct faculty, graduate assistants and resident assistants

2. North Carolina State UniversityCapped student work hours and adjunct hours

3. Kansas UniversityCapped student work hours at 29 per week

4. Southern Polytechnic State University (Georgia) – Capped student work hours at 20 and capped adjunct hours

5. McNeese State University (Louisiana) – Capped student work hours at 29 per week

6. University of Colorado – Colorado Springs –  Capped student work hours at 25 per week

7. Wright State University (Ohio) – Capped student work hours at 28 per week

8. Georgia Institute of TechnologyCapped student and temp employee work hours at 25 per week and capped adjunct hours

9. Cinncinatti State Technical & Community CollegeCapped hours for part-timers and hours for adjuncts

10. Technical College System of GeorgiaCapped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

11. South Dakota State UniversityCapped student work hours at 29 per week

12. Arkansas Tech UniversityCapped student work hours at 28 per week

13. Kennesaw State University (Georgia) – Capped teaching loads for part-time faculty

14. Butler Community College (Kansas) – Capped hours for students and part time workers at 28 per week and cut adjunct hours

15. Lakeland College (Wisconsin) – Capped summer work hours for students at 29 per week

16. Colorado Mountain CollegeCapped hours of adjunct faculty at 29 per week

17. Grand Rapids Community College (Michigan) – Capped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

18. Mississippi State UniversityCapped hours for student workers at 28 per week

19. La Sierra University (California) – Capped student work hours at 25 per week

20. El Paso Community College (Texas) – Capped teaching loads for part-time faculty

21. University of Northern IowaPlanned cap to student work hours at 20 per week

22. Lone Star College SystemCapped teaching-load for part-time faculty

23. Western Michigan UniversityCapped student work hours at 25 per week

24. St. Edward’s University (Texas) – Capped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

25. Christendom University (Virginia) – Capped hours for students at 29 per week

26. Flathead Valley Community College (Montana) – Capped adjunct faculty teaching hours

27. Penn State UniversityCapped campus work hours, capped adjunct teaching loads

28. University of Central MissouriCapped hours for part-time workers and adjuncts at 29 per week

29. Murray State University (Kentucky) – Capped adjunct teaching loads

30. University of San FranciscoCapped student work hours at 20 per week

31. Carroll Community College (Maryland) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

32. Community College of Baltimore County (Maryland) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

33. Clemson University (South Carolina) – Capped student workers at 28 hours per week

34. Oakton Community College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty hours at 27 per week

35. Biola University (California) – Planned cap to student work hours at 25 per week

36. Sam Houston State University (Texas) – Capped student work hours at 29 per week

37. Eastern Florida State CollegeCapped hours of part-time employees at 28 per week

38. Mid-Plains Community College (Nebraska) – Capped hours of adjunct faculty, other workers at 28 per week

39. Arizona State UniversityCapped hours of associate faculty members

40. Finger Lakes Community College (New York) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

41. Southern Illinois UniversityCapped graduate teaching assistants at 20 hours per week

42. Georgia Military CollegeCapped hours of adjunct faculty to 29 per week

43. Ball State University (Indiana) – Capped work hours for graduate assistants

44. Forsyth Technical Community College (North Carolina) – Capped hours for adjunct faculty at 29 per week

45. Wilkes Community College (North Carolina) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

46. Philadelphia UniversityCapped hours for adjunct faculty at 29 per week

47. Three Rivers CollegeCapped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

48. Bergen Community College (New Jersey) – Capped adjunct faculty hours

49. Ozarks Technical Community College (Missouri) – Capped part-time faculty work hours at 24 per week

50. University of AlabamaCapped student work hours at 20 per week

51. Hillsborough Community College (Florida) – Capped part-time faculty work hours

52. St. Petersburgh College (Florida) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 27 per week

53. Central Michigan UniversityCapped student work hours at 25 per week

54. University of North AlabamaCapped student work hours at 29 per week

55. Pulaski Technical CollegeCapped work hours for adjunct faculty

56. San Diego Community College DistrictCapped student work hours at 25 per week

57. Drury University (Missouri) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours

58. Cumberland University (Tennessee) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 27 per week

59. Auburn University (Alabama) – Capped student work hours at 20 per week

60. Palm Beach State College (Florida) – Capped hours for 100 part-time faculty at 27.5 per week

61. Santa Fe College (Florida) – Capped part-time faculty hours at 27.5 per week

62. Tallahassee Community College (Florida) – Capped part-time work hours at 24 per week

63. Parkland College (Illinois) – Capped hours for part-time, non-teaching workers at 27.5 per week

64. Indiana UniversityCapped hours for part-timers at 29 per week

65. Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty at 29 per week

66. Howard Community College (Maryland) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty

67. Spartanburg Community College (South Carolina) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

68. Southern Utah UniversityCapped student work hours at 20 per week and capped adjunct teaching loads

69. Arkansas State UniversityCapped student, adjunct faculty, and part-time work hours at 28 per week

70. Texas Christian UniversityCapped student, adjunct faculty, and part-time work hours at 29 per week

71. Des Moines Area CommunityCollege Capped sadjunct faculty summer hours

72. Maricopa Community Colleges (Arizona) – Capped adjunct faculty and part-time work hours at 29 per week

73. University of ArizonaCapped work hours for temporary employees

74. College of DuPage (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty course loads

75. McHenry County College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 24 per week

76. Sinclair Community College (Ohio) – Capped part-time work hours at 28 per week and cut adjunct faculty hours

77. Dallas County Community College DistrictCapped adjunct faculty work hours

78. New Mexico State UniversityCapped graduate-student work hours at 25 per week

79. Blue Ridge Community and Technical College (West Virginia) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

80. Ohio State UniversityCapped student work hours at 28 per week

81. Ohio UniversityCapped student and graduate assistant work hours at 28 hours of work per week during summer

82. Union County College (New Jersey) – Capped adjunct faculty teaching loads

83. Daytona State College (Florida) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty

84. Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

85. Kalamazoo Valley Community College (Michigan) – Capped part-time faculty work hours

86. St. Clair Community College (Michigan) – Capped adjunct professors and part-time work hours at 29 per week

87. Moberly Area Community College (Missouri) – Capped adjunct faculty course loads

88. Community College System of New HampshireCapped adjunct faculty work hours at 27 per week

89. Cuyahoga Community College (Ohio) – Capped part-time work hours at 20 per week

90. University of Akron (Ohio) – Capped course loads for part-time faculty

91. Brigham Young University (Utah) – Capped work hours for students and part-time workers at 29 per week

92. Elmhurst College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct teaching load at one course per semester

93. Columbus State Community College (Ohio) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

94. Joliet Junior College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty course loads

95. Hudson Valley Community College (New York) – Capped part-time faculty work hours

96. Baldwin-Wallace University (Ohio) – Capped course load of adjunct faculty

97. Kent State University (Ohio) – Capped course load of adjunct faculty

98. Lakeland Community College (Ohio) – Capped course load of adjunct faculty

99. Bowling Green State University (Ohio) – Capped part-time work hours at 24 per week and student work hours at 28

100. Shawnee State University (Ohio) – Capped teaching hours for adjunct faculty

101. Virginia TechCapped work hours for part-timer and adjunct faculty at 29 per week

102. Miami Dade College (Florida) – Capped part-time work hours at 25 per week

103. Christopher Newport University (Virginia) – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

104. College of William & Mary (Virginia) – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

105. Norfolk State University (Virginia) – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

106. Virginia Commonwealth University – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

107. Virginia Community College SystemCapped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

108. George Mason University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

109. James Madison University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

110. Longwood University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

111. Old Dominion University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

112. Radford University (Virginia) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty

113. University of Mary Washington (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

114. Utah Valley UniversityCapped part-time workers at 28 hours per week and capped adjunct teaching loads

115. Illinois Valley Community CollegeCapped part-time work hours at 29 per week

116. Rock Valley College (Illinois) – Capped part-time work hours at 25 per week

117. Chesapeake College (Maryland) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 28 per week

118. Kean University (New Jersey) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours

119. Stark State College (Ohio) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

120. Youngstown State University (Ohio) – Capped work hours of part-time and adjunct faculty

121. Community College of Allegheny College (Pennsylvania) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty and other part-time workers

122. University of Colorado, BoulderCapped student work hours at 25 per week

Please contact us for additions or corrections.

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College Fix reporter Derek Draplin, a student at the University of Michigan, helped compile this report.

IMAGE: Dr. Farouk/Flickr

Since the launch of Obamacare, at least 122 colleges and universities across the nation have cut student and faculty work hours to skirt the federal law’s mandate requiring employers to provide healthcare for people who work 30 hours or more per week.

Those who have seen their paychecks shrink as a result of the Affordable Care Act include students who work on campus at restaurants, bookstores or gyms, teaching assistants, Residence Advisers, officer workers, student journalists, and a variety of other workers, such as part-time maintenance crews and groundskeepers. Educators’ work hours have also been cut due to the mandate, including part-time instructors and adjunct professors.

A long and growing list of 450 companies, school districts, colleges and institutions that have slashed and capped work hours to comply with the employer mandate – which goes into effect next year – has been compiled by Jed Graham of Investor’s Business Daily, whose tally chronicles employers both public and private.

“Critics say the Affordable Care Act gives businesses an incentive to cut workers’ hours below the 30-hour-per-week threshold at which the employer mandate to provide health insurance kicks in,” Graham notes. “White House economists dismiss such evidence as anecdotal. … In the interest of an informed debate, we’ve compiled a list of job actions with strong proof that Obamacare’s employer mandate is behind cuts to work hours or staffing levels.”

The list, which Graham started in August 2013, is nowhere near being comprehensive, as many employers have not been clear about how they’re adhering to the mandate, he said in an email to The College Fix.

“I do not think this list is close to being comprehensive,” Graham said. “While colleges and universities are far more transparent about workforce policies than the private sector, even many public sector employers have been less than crystal clear about how they are responding to the employer mandate.”

Obamacare has essentially created a greater financial burden for students, according to Graham.

“College and graduate school already leave students with a large financial burden and anything that restricts the ability to earn money risks adding to that burden,” Graham said.

With permission from Graham, The College Fix extracted the colleges and universities cited on the list to create a unique tally that shows the impact of Obamacare on campuses nationwide.

Among the dozens of universities and colleges that have cut hours are North Carolina State University, Kansas University, Penn State University, Clemson University, Arizona State University, University of Alabama, Indiana University, University of Arizona, Ohio State University, and Virginia Tech. As of Oct. 27, there are 122 on the list, and The College Fix will add to it as more campuses slash and cap hours as a result of the federal law.

Students, scholars pan law

Samantha Watkins, a student at Point Loma University and a regular contributor to The College Fix,  recently wrote about her experiences as a student employed by her university.

“Hour caps for students working on campus make it a challenge for those who financially need it,” she said in an email to The College Fix. “And off campus jobs mean a commute, if students are able to find ample transportation.”

Among others critical of the Obamacare employer mandate are professors and medical doctors.

“Reduced hours will do net harm to students,” D. Eric Schansberg, a professor of economics at Indiana University Southeast who recently co-wrote an op-ed critical of the effects Obamacare would have on students, told The College Fix in an email. “If they preferred fewer hours, the market– between employers and employees– would have reached that outcome. Some students will find other jobs; others will have tighter budgets; and so on.”

Professor Schansberg also gave an example comparing the effects of the government mandate to increasing workers’ wages, having both positive and negative outcomes, depending on the worker’s situation.

“The government’s actions are always contingent,” he said. “For example, the simplest model (a labor demand curve) would say that a higher minimum wage will help those who keep their jobs and harm those who lose their jobs. On the one hand, you’re increasing wages for those who have jobs– but you’re also making them more expensive to hire.”

“The ACA is similar,” Schansberg argued. “You can mandate X– or connect X to a tax/penalty– under certain circumstances. But then you make those circumstances less likely.”

“Employers will look to avoid those conditions when possible. And when employers are particularly flexible– as in this case– one would expect them to often avoid those conditions,” he said.

Graham also explained the problems with the employee mandate, which he says have caused a plunge in workweek hours for low-wage industries, shrinking to an average of 27.3 hours.

“There had been – and still is – a lot of denial from supposed experts that the employer mandate was having an impact. This effort, I think, helps to show that the anecdotal evidence is pretty weighty,” Graham explained, referencing his list of businesses that have cut hours. “But I haven’t relied only on anecdotes. I have used government data to show that the work week among low-wage private sector industries has shrunk to a record low and the share of workers clocking just above 30 hours per week has plunged relative to those with hours just below Obamacare’s 30-hour full-time threshold.”

Dr. Rob Steele, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School who is running for University Regent also had critical words of the employee mandate and subsequent cut hours.

“The government view of the solution for students needing insurance is to go on their parents plan if you are under 26,” he said in an email to The College Fix. “Usually the students are more worried about a decrease in pay rather than the insurance.”

“The reduction in hours will increase because the costs of insurance will continue to rise.”

College Fix reporter Derek Draplin is a student at the University of Michigan.

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IMAGE: Dr. Farouk/Flickr

We already knew that Obamacare was spurring some colleges to cut student hours so they wouldn’t qualify for free healthcare – even for student journalists.

Now the law has been cited by the University of Colorado-Boulder for its new 25-hour weekly cap on student work hours, Colorado Springs CBS affiliate KKTV reports.

For students bummed about losing income that could pay for tuition and textbook price spikes, there’s a silver lining, the newscast says: “The school believes it will also help students focus on getting their degrees.”

h/t Washington Free Beacon

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IMAGE: KKTV screenshot

I know there are a lot of pressing matters in this world right now: radical Muslim extremists continue to chop the heads off people at home and abroad; bizarre health threats like that respiratory illness and the Ebola virus has freaked everyone out right now; atrocious abuses of power committed by the IRS and NSA remain unprosecuted; and Common Core is dumbing down our children faster than anything they watch on TV.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

But one subject I hope does not leave the minds and lips and keyboards of the American people anytime soon is how bad Obamacare is for this country. I know it’s largely slipped off the front pages, and calls for repeal have died down. But it remains one of the worst government mandates to ever be created and it continues to wreak havoc on millions of Americans, including and frequently college students.

Here’s the latest headline, just one of many that cross my desk every week: “Obamacare Limits Student Employee Hours.”

It was published by the student newspaper at Oswego State University in New York and reports that “State University of New York recently updated and revised its student employment policy, which by result of the Affordable Care Act, will limit students employed by their college to work a maximum of 20 hours per week during the academic year and 29 hours per week during the summer.”

Thousands and thousands of colleges across America have done the same.

I am not going to go into how Obamacare has not lived up to its promises, blatantly misled the American people, and has been a boondoggle and a disaster for so many, just type “Obamacare” in our search engine and you’ll see dozens of stories that detail all that.

But the sliver of hope I had held onto that perhaps somehow this national nightmare could be repealed is diminishing. And that’s a shame, for our country and its future.

Jennifer Kabbany is editor of The College Fix (@JenniferKabbany)

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Indiana University Southeast business professor Linda Christiansen and economics professor D. Eric Schansber rip Obamacare a new one in a jointly bylined op-ed that ran over the weekend in The Star Press.

Headlined “ObamaCare: A Tale of Four Students,” it outlines how college students of all stripes – those who work for their colleges (teaching assistants, Residence Advisers, etc.) and even those who work elsewhere, are getting screwed by the new law, which purportedly aimed to help young people but actually makes matters much worse for them. All of the students in the column have been penalized by the legislation in different ways.

The op-ed explains the law’s “perverse and largely-ignored consequences.”

Thanks to ObamaCare, there are many more contexts in which working less — and hiring people to work fewer hours — has become financially attractive. Aside from the amazingly slow pace of the economic recovery by historical standards, all of this also explains why we’ve had so much growth in part-time work and so little in full-time work. …

ObamaCare did nothing to reduce the problems created earlier by the government. Instead, in its attempt to help some people, it extended those problems and added new ones — by multiplying and complicating the links between health insurance, work and family.

And college students are some of the worst off thanks to Obamacare.

Read the full column.

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Telling the government rather than an insurance company that a university will not pay for contraceptives, such as abortion-inducing drugs, is only a “cosmetic” change that still forces a university to “facilitate” its employees getting contraception, four Christian universities in Oklahoma said in a new filing in their challenge to Obamacare’s contraceptive mandate.

Represented by the Alliance Defending Freedom, the universities told the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals the administration’s new “accommodation” – in which the government arranges cost-free contraception for university employees after a school files its “religious objections” directly with the Department of Health and Human Services – still makes universities complicit:

They must still file a document causing their health plan, insurer, and/or third party administrator (TPA) to be commandeered by the government and used as a mule to deliver certain objectionable items. Under the old accommodation invocation mechanism, they completed and sent a particular form to the insurer or TPA; now it is a letter to the government identifying the insurer or TPA, which causes a letter to be sent to the insurer or TPA. …

The government could use its money—which under the new rule it offers to pay to TPAs—to deliver these items through the government’s own channels, without hijacking the Universities’ own plan administrator or insurer by means of the Universities’ contracts and their letters to the government. But the government stubbornly insists on involving the Universities in the delivery channels anyway.

It’s a “semantic” argument that universities won’t end up paying for abortion-inducing drugs:

[T]he government cannot deny that the payments for objectionable items that the Universities’ insurers would offer under the interim rule are part of the Universities’ own coverage. Therefore the Universities are substantially burdened because they are being required to provide a plan that covers the items, despite the government’s semantic denial of that fact.

Senior Counsel Gregory Baylor of the Alliance Defending Freedom says religious nonprofits should get the same exemption offered to churches, rather than a string of proposed accommodations which indicate that the government can find “less restrictive” ways of providing contraception.

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