university of california

Judicial Watch Inc. has filed a lawsuit against the University of California Board of Regents seeking to put an end to “in-state tuition and financial aid to undocumented students.”

The Daily Bruin reports:

The lawsuit, filed on behalf of Earl De Vries who was a former Republican candidate in the California State Senate, claims that federal law prevents undocumented immigrants from receiving state or local benefits such as in-state tuition for the UC, according to a press release Thursday.

Under the U.S. code Title VIII. 1621, undocumented immigrants are ineligible for state benefits unless the state has enacted a law that provides eligibility for those benefits. The lawsuit alleges that California has not enacted such a law for the UC.

About 900 students at the UC are identified as undocumented as of 2013. The lawsuit estimates that about $30 million is given to undocumented students every year.

The suit appears to face an uphill battle as Assembly Bill 540, which was passed in 2001, “grants in-state tuition for undocumented students and applies to the California State University and California Community Colleges systems.”

AB 540 was previously challenged in 2006, and was upheld by the California Supreme Court in 2010. The current challenge claims that “that those voluntary (UC) adoptions of state laws do not equal to actual state laws that make undocumented students eligible for in-state tuition.”

Read the full article here.

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OPINION: Students dole out little hand towels instead. Here’s why this is a horrible idea.

SANTA BARBARA – Paper towels have been removed from several dormitory bathrooms at UC Santa Barbara as a first step in a larger effort that aims to banish all disposable squares of absorbent paper from campus dorm restrooms.

Members of the “UCSB Paper Towel Free Project” have doled out small, blue hand towels embroidered with the words “UCSB Zero Waste” in yellow to the affected students, who are expected to carry the hand towels to the lavatory every time they need to take a leak.

The paper towel dispensers that used to hang in the targeted areas now sit empty and unused.

The pilot project – launched in the fall and something students hope to soon implement in all campus dorm bathrooms – is designed to help save the environment and meet the lofty and unrealistic goal of the University of California system to become zero waste by 2020.

However, it remains to be seen whether the undertaking factors in the cleansing habits of the average college student – most of whom didn’t even wash their bed sheets all semester long, let alone remember to carry around a towel to dry their hands.

Why don’t these intrepid student environmentalists install hand dryers? Too noisy, according to the first initial phase of the pilot project.

Apparently they didn’t have the budget for super-quiet or low-energy dryers common these days, but they do have the funds to blow on a bunch of Gaucho-blue towels that likely ended up curled and molding in the corner of most bedrooms.towel.UCSB

In an email to The College Fix, Residence Hall Association President Andrew Soriano claims the amount of money spent on the project is comparable to the amount of money spent on filling and refilling paper towels in an academic year. But in this liberal Southern California city of Santa Barbara – in which the City Council recently voted unanimously to ban plastic grocery bags – the consequences of this project far outweigh anything else.

Students are “expected to take it with them to the bathroom when they need to go and wash their hands, and they’re expected to take care of it,” junior Arriana Rabago, an environmental studies major and one of the co-chairs of the project, told The Bottom Line campus newspaper about the hand towels.

Nevermind that nowadays most paper towels are generally made from recycled paper. Nevermind that unbleached recycled paper towels can be thrown away in separate containers then transported to commercial composters.

As for this pilot project, it hardly seems fair that the initial participants were residents of the so-called “environmental floors,” on which students can elect to reside in to be amongst like-minded peers (there’s also a creative arts floor, for example).

One would think that if those presenting this endeavor wanted a real handle on how it would work out they should have used a random sample of average, dorm-dwelling college students.

Here’s the bottom line: taking away the paper towels that some 5,000 freshmen and sophomores living in campus dorms use to dry their hands after they wash them – after they’ve relieved themselves, and touched toilets and bathroom stall doors – and asking them to carry around and use towels instead is unrealistic and – what’s more – unsanitary.

Soriano said “students are given full autonomy when given their towel.”

So what happens when – not if – students either don’t wash their hands because they didn’t bring their hand towel, or wash their hands then wipe them dry on someone else’s hand towel or shower towel hanging around? Bacteria spreads, germs spread. At a campus still reeling from a serious meningitis outbreak, is this really a smart idea?

As a student that lives on campus at UCSB and uses dorm restrooms, I cannot see this project working successfully. This project will cause more harm than good. If UCSB works on better recycling rather than create a project that will have more consequences than benefits, residential housing will be better off.

Thankfully, the committees involved – UCSB’s Residence Hall Association, Associated Students Zero Waste Committee, and Housing and Residential Services – still consider this a test project.

Good. Throw this idea in the recycle bin.

College Fix contributor Austin Yack is a student at UC Santa Barbara.

IMAGE: Maggie Osterberg/Flickr

American Enterprise Institute adjunct scholar and Ohio University economics Professor Richard Vedder asked a very important question on Bloomberg recently: “What Do 2,358 College Administrators Do?”

The question was posed in response to the news that outgoing Homeland Security secretary Janet Napolitano was approved as the new president of the University of California’s 10-campus, 234,000-student system. Vedder noted Napolitano will fit right in in the bloated, bureaucratic system.

He pointed out that the system’s central office in Oakland employs a whopping 2,358 full-time employees. So what do they do, The College Fix asks, besides waste taxpayer dollars, contribute to the ever-rising costs of college, and ignore the politicization of the campus?

Wait. It gets worse.

Vedder writes:

… UC’s annual spending exceeds that of most state governments, amounting to roughly $100,000 for each of its students. Much of this is unrelated to instructional function. The university’s bureaucracy is famously monumental, centralized and costly: Aside from a full cohort of administrators and support staff at each of the 10 campuses, the central office in Oakland employs more than 2,000 workers, a staggering number (2,358 full-time employees, according to the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System). There are 10 “divisions” in the Office of the President, for example. Its “external relations” division lists more than 55 managerial-type employees on organizational charts, and that number doesn’t include support personnel.

The “business operations” and “academic affairs” divisions are much larger. One senior non-UC university president said to me once that the central office could be reduced by more than half and the university wouldn’t suffer.

The university took some budgetary hits from the state in recent years but offset them with huge tuition increases. No serious attempt was made to vastly cut costs. How many senior faculty at, say, Berkeley teach more than 200 hours a year? How much of the so-called research by these professors is read or cited? I suspect a lot of it has little impact. How many buildings lie largely dormant for months each year?

… For all its moaning about tight finances, the University of California has largely been financially protected from and blind to the economic reality in the outside world: In the U.S. — and especially California — economic growth has been falling, college costs have been rising faster than incomes, student-loan debt has been piling up, and the labor market has stagnated.

Rather than bring in a leader with a proven record of recognizing the need to re-examine the public university and innovate to face these realities, the university’s Board of Regents has brought in a veteran at managing and perpetuating bureaucracies, one well-connected enough to keep the federal flow of support coming and to shake more money from the state’s already overburdened taxpayers.

Well stated, Dr. Vedder. Well stated.

The sad truth is, the higher education system is broken, and it’s only a matter of time before the bubble bursts.

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U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano has been nominated to become president of the University of California system, and a leading conservative scholar said the choice is a poor, politically biased pick.

“She has neither qualifications nor experience for running an academic institution,” John Ellis, president of the conservative California Association of Scholars, said in an email to The College Fix. “If you are going to appoint a political figure to a post that requires they be non-political, it matters that both sides of the political spectrum don’t see her as a strongly partisan figure. But nobody could say that in her case.”

Ellis, a UC Santa Cruz professor emeritus, added the association is engaged in an ongoing struggle for the system to acknowledge and address its well-documented left-leaning bias, and Napolitano’s selection will only impede those efforts.

“As many polls show, the California public is very concerned about the politicization of UC classrooms,” he said in his statement. “Instead of being mindful of that problem, the regents have just made it very much worse: they have invited a nationally prominent political figure to head the university.”

The association frequently cites various faculty surveys which find that for every eight professors in California who identified themselves as either left-leaning, Democrat or socialist, one professor identified themselves as conservative or Republican.

In many cases, however, studies found the margins at UC campuses and elsewhere are often closer to 30:2. Another survey found professors would be more inclined to hire a communist than a Republican.

Napolitano, who’s had a polarizing term as U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary serving under Democrat President Barack Obama, said she recognized she was a non-traditional candidate to lead the 10-campus, 234,000-student system, according to system officials.

Supporters of the selection have been quick to tout Napolitano’s political experience, hypothesizing she will be able to use her savvy as a way to secure more state funding and support for the UC system, which has faced budget cuts in the wake of the economic recession.

But Napolitano, dubbed “Big Sis” by conservative media outlets, had has plenty of gaffes during her tenure as homeland security secretary.

Political reporter Andrew Stiles of National Review Online chronicled those many missteps in a recent article:

The time she said the 9/11 hijackers came from Canada. The time DHS published a report on the growing threat of “rightwing extremists.” The time she (allegedly) dabbled in cronyism. The time she said the border is secure. The time she ordered bagpipes during sequestration. The time she ruined airports for everyone. The time she hid in an elevator to avoid taking a stance on gay marriage.

Ellis said her selection does not bode well for the UC system, saying Napolitano will likely sympathize with “the classroom excesses of UC’s radical left faculty.”

Jennifer Kabbany is associate editor of The College Fix.

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As student debt and tuition costs soar, so do public college presidents’ salaries – by the millions.

That’s the long and short of a series of articles published Sunday that highlighted The Chronicle of Higher Education’s survey of public college presidents’ salaries in 2012.

“Public U. Presidents Make Bank,” screamed the Daily Beast.

The Baltimore Sun did a little math on the list, noting “four presidents at public research universities made a collective $9.2 million in fiscal year 2012.”

What’s worse – the college president who earned the most last year got his loot – because he was fired.

“While former president of Penn State University, Graham Spanier, left the university during the worst scandal it has seen during his 16 year tenure, he was well compensated as the highest-paid public university president last year,” ABC News reported. “Spanier received total compensation of $2.9 million in the 2011-12 school year, including $1.2 million in severance pay and $1.2 million in deferred compensation paid during that year. Spanier was fired as president in November 2011 for his handling of the child sex-abuse scandal involving former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.”

In other reports, The Detroit News noted that “two public university presidents in Michigan rank among the highest-paid in the nation, with one in the top 10.” One earned $918,783. The other – $672,000.

The median total compensation for public college presidents, by the way, is $441,392 for 2012,  according to The Chronicle.

“Jay Gogue, Auburn University in Alabama, was the second-highest paid president in the nation, earning a $2.5 million package,” the Detroit News reported. “E. Gordon Gee, president of Ohio State University, earned a $1.89 million package.”

Many articles on the subject were quick to note that these salaries come as the so-called higher education bubble is bigger than ever, with tuition costs that continue to soar, ballooning student debt, and many recent college grads who remain unemployed or underemployed.

“Salaries of presidents of U.S. public universities rose almost 5 percent in the last fiscal year, even as tuition rose and student debt soared, with the median pay package topping $400,000, according to a report released on Sunday,” Reuters reported.

In comparison, Reuters noted, “The Chronicle surveyed compensation at private colleges in 2010, and found that 36 private college presidents earned more than $1 million. The median pay of the 494 presidents surveyed was $397,860.”

The Top Ten public college presidents’ salaries for 2012 is as follows, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education:

Graham Spanier, Penn State University, $2,906,721.

Jay Gogue, Auburn University, $2,542,865

E. Gordon Gee, Ohio State University, $1,899,420

Alan Merten, George Mason University, $1,869,369

Jo Ann Gora, Ball State University, $984,647

Mary Sue Coleman, University of Michigan system, $918,783

Charles Steger, Virginia Tech, $857,749

Mark Yudof, University of California system, $847,149

Bernard Machen, University of Florida, $834,562

Francisco Cigarroa, University of Texas system, $815,833

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A city college professor whose class devoted entirely to pornography made national headlines recently defended his course as worthy and important, adding that President George W. Bush and his abstinence-only sex education policies are partly to blame for why there’s such a need for a pornography class.

“Most of my students were born in the early-to-mid-1990s; they hit puberty under the influence of two conflicting social realities: the widespread availability of broadband and the Bush-era abstinence-only sex education policies,” says Professor Hugo Schwyzer. “The latter deprived far too many of them of accurate, comprehensive, pleasure-based information about sex; increasing access to the former meant that Internet pornography became the primary and ubiquitous source of information about the birds and the bees.”

With that, argued Schwyzer in his May 9 The Atlantic piece, “what was designed to arouse and entertain now is expected to educate as well.”

Schwyzer, who teaches “Navigating Pornography” at Pasadena City College, also defended his class as commonplace.

“Today, dozens of courses on pornography are offered on college campuses across the country, taught by instructors from a wide variety of disciplines including film, women’s studies, art, sociology, psychology, English, and history,” he wrote.

In his piece, however, he names only one: “University of California, Santa Barbara Professor Constance Penley has taught Topics in Film Genre: Pornographic Filmsince 1993.”

Although he does point out how professors often slip in pornography screenings into classes, and how academics undertake journals, books and studies about pornography, including a new peer-reviewed publication launching next year.

He also aimed to offer proof his course is quite an academic one – students study the origins of modern pornography, with special attention paid to the Marquis de Sade; its modern day business aspects; and the landmark 1973 obscenity case Miller v. California. Critics of porn’s misogynistic tendencies are also broached in the classroom, he argued.

He rounds out the piece by pointing out his personal reasons for offering the course.

“Even more than history lessons and an introduction to feminist debates, my students need and deserve the tools to combat sexual shame,” Schwyzer wrote. “Students need more than history and theory. They need safe spaces to think through—and in some instances, talk through—their fears, desires, and uncertainties. When it comes to a subject like porn, a safe space means a place where they won’t be judged, mocked, or sexualized regardless of what they reveal.”

And there it is. Porn continues to be justified as a viable part of mainstream higher education curriculums.

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