wacky news

Does this story make you feel “safer?”

An Austin, Texas, teenager faces eight years in prison for making a “terroristic threat” after he made a sarcastic comment online about shooting up a school.

Justin Carter was 18 back in February when a dispute over the online video game “League of Legends took an ugly turn on Facebook, KHOU.com reported.

“Someone had said something to the effect of ‘Oh you’re insane, you’re crazy, you’re messed up in the head,’ to which he replied, ‘Oh yeah, I’m real messed up in the head, I’m going to go shoot up a school full of kids and eat their still, beating hearts,’ and the next two lines were lol and jk,” said Jack Carter, Justin’s father…

Apparently, this kid has been in jail since March.

Read the full story here.

(via Drudge)

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Well, this is a relief. Earlier this month, The College Fix reported on the case of a Florida student who was facing felony charges for what school officials described as a science experiment gone bad.

On 7 a.m. on Monday, the 16 year-old mixed some common household chemicals in a small 8 oz water bottle on the grounds of Bartow High School in Bartow, Florida. The reaction caused a small explosion that caused the top to pop up and produced some smoke. No one was hurt and no damage was caused…

“She made a bad choice. Honestly, I don’t think she meant to ever hurt anyone,” principal Ron Pritchard told the station. “She wanted to see what would happen [when the chemicals mixed] and was shocked by what it did. Her mother is shocked, too.”

Today, we are happy to report that sanity, in this case, seems to have prevailed.

Even her school principal admitted that it merely sounded like a firecracker.

However, she found herself expelled from school and arrested for felonious possession/discharge of a dangerous weapon.

It emerged that the same D.A who charged her had, two days previously, decided not to charge a 13-year-old who shot dead his 10-year-old brother.

However, now there is some good news. Or, at least, sane news. The criminal charges have been dropped. She will not have to live her life as a felon.

So the same D.A. who charged this girl, who had a perfect behavioral record prior to the incident, with a felony, didn’t charge another kid for shooting someone but still had to charge this girl? Bizarre!

Well, we’re glad the case seems to have come to a happy ending and everyone can go on with their lives!

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The latest example of moral decline of “art” at one of our nation’s “elite” universities:

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Students at Carnegie Mellon say it’s freedom of expression, but the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh calls it inappropriate and disrespectful.

At an annual art school parade, a female student dressed up as the pope, and was naked from the waist down while she passed out condoms.

Even more, witnesses say the woman had shaved her pubic hair in the shape of a cross.

Read the full story here.

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(Via Drudge)

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MyFoxNY reports:

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – A second-grade teacher has been fired for insubordination and inappropriate behavior, including urinating in his northern New Jersey classroom…

The state found the teacher once urinated in a classroom trash can, sometimes urinated in a plastic bottle and asked students to take his waste to the boys’ bathroom and flush it, and let students sit in his motorized wheelchair.

Read more here.

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Via: Drudge

(Image by Dave Cobb/Flickr)

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We’re all for hands-on learning. But, in hindsight, this probably wasn’t such a good idea:

ROWLETT, Texas — What started off as a history lesson at Schrade Middle School in Rowlett ended up with a 7th grader having rope marks around his neck.

A history teacher was trying to teach lasso techniques used during cattle drives. He asked for student volunteers, and had them run… then tried to rope them.

“[The teacher] was visiting with the students, telling the students about how Cowboys would corral maverick steers back into the herd,” explained Garland Independent School District spokesman Chris Moore.

The 13-year-old volunteer ended up with bruises.

“This is not something that we feel was malicious, it was not intent,” Moore said. “Extremely unfortunate, and extremely poor judgment.”

The Garland ISD has launched an investigation and suspended the teacher, they say for precautionary reasons.

Only in Texas.

Read the full story here.

Via: Drudge

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In the “People’s Republic of Boulder,” by City Council decree, residents are known as “pet guardians,” and now they’ve stretched their roles to guardians of wild life as well.

On Sunday, about 50 people gathered at Pearl Street Mall for a candlelight vigil to demand justice for an adult, male elk shot by a police officer in a suburban Boulder neighborhood on New Year’s Day.

To honor the elk, participants played recordings of elk bugling from their cell phones. They passed out flyers to passersby. They vowed to mount pressure on police as the investigation continues. In addition to the vigil, a silent march took place recently as well.

Since the shooting, town meetings have been held. The chief of police has made statements. An announcement from the district attorney on whether charges will be filed against the police officer, who reportedly failed to handle the situation by the book, is expected today.

Meanwhile, in interviews with The College Fix, some CU Boulder students offered a different perspective, calling the reactions a bit much, even insulting.

Junior Taylor Lane, 20, said she thought the vigil was “extreme.”

“So many people in Boulder are concerned with our ecological, or ethical, facade and this is a perfect example,” she said. “One animal was shot out of season. I’m certain more than that are hit by traffic on a daily basis.”

What’s more, the Boulder community did not hold a vigil for the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in Newtown, Conn., in mid-December, in which a classroom of young students were gunned down by a mentally unstable gunman.

Senior Mitchell Whitus, 20, said he feels the Boulder community reacted “to the wrong thing.”

“I saw a report on Channel 4 about the vigil, and a lady who was there compared the shooting of the elk to the Sandy Hook shooting,” he said. “I’m appalled that they would compare the shooting to the massacre of children. Why not hold a vigil for the Sandy Hook shooting, instead? It is crazy.”

Nearly half of Boulder’s residents are registered Democrats, and the city is widely understood as the home of “pet guardians” and environmentalists.

Nevertheless, their reaction to the elk shooting also runs in stark contrast to the lack of any uproar over a bear that was tranquilized on the CU Boulder campus last year, then found dead after being hit by a car.

Meanwhile, other students felt the Boulder community used the elk as a symbol to gather around, but failed to hit on the bigger question of the police officer’s conduct in shooting the beloved creature.

Senior Elizabeth Coombs, 22, said the elk is the wrong target.

“I think we should focus on the potential abuse of power by the officer if he was, indeed, on duty when he shot the elk,” she said.

Fix contributor Aslinn Scott is a student at CU Boulder.

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IMAGE: Odolaigh/Flickr

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