College Fix Staff

Chad Dion Lassiter is president of Black Men at Penn, and is quite concerned with what neighboring institution Temple is doing to North Philadelphia.

Mr. Lassiter claims in a letter that Temple and developers “are carving out a white enclave” in the area where “most black folks will be unwelcomed.”

Via Philly.com:

What Temple wants is a white enclave of racial and class privilege. This makes Temple University and its developer friend not just gentrifiers, but guilty of resegregating Philadelphia on the model of South African apartheid.

This is a “New Jim Crow.”

This form of Jim Crow is about urban space and land. It’s about replacing black folks with upper-middle-class whites. It’s about disrupting black communities and institutions. It’s about disrespect. It’s a return to the horrible past of blatant white supremacy.

In this respect, Temple is as bad as any white Southern oppressor from back in the day. The name of the game is a few crumbs off the table for some, but old-style white supremacy for the majority.

Temple’s plans for North Philly are the same as its plans on how it will operate the university. Temple’s faculty is overwhelming white: Blacks (4.6 percent) and Hispanics (2.7 percent). Minorities are a diminishing part of the faculty. Its top administrators are almost entirely white.

Over the last 15 years, there’s been a dramatic decline in black students, especially from Philadelphia. Temple acts like it doesn’t even want black kids from Philadelphia, and especially North Philadelphia. This applies to even the most gifted.

Lassiter goes on to recommend “demonstrations, sit-ins, civil disobedience, [and] teach-ins” to help stop this alleged racial travesty, and says that Temple “must renegotiate its relationship to black Philadelphia in general, but with its neighbors in North Philadelphia especially.”

In addition, Lassiter wants an agreement that North Philly “will not become a playground for its white students,” and that the (black) racial character of the area will “be preserved.”

Hmm … how would such a statement be received if the races noted above were reversed?

Read the full letter.

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An eight year-old boy at Harold McCormick Elementary School in Elizabethton, Tennessee brought home a handout which stated those on Mount Rushmore were … racists.

The handout, provided by the Nation of Islam(!), was titled “What does it take to be on Mount Rushmore?” and noted that George Washington was a “prime breeder of black people,” and that Teddy Roosevelt called Africans “ape-like.”

Fox News reports:

There were also disparaging remarks made of Thomas Jefferson (he enslaved 200 Africans) and Abraham Lincoln.

She [the mother, Sommer Bauer] said her jaw dropped when she followed the link to a website that was listed on the handout. Imagine her surprise when up popped the Nation of Islam home page.

The Nation of Islam believes there is no God but Allah. They also aren’t all that keen on white folks or Jewish folks.

“It raised a number of red flags,” she said. “They are basically saying our Founding Fathers are racists.”

Sommer told me she reached out to the teacher for an explanation – hoping it was an honest mistake.

“At first, she did not recall which paper it was,” she said. “Later in the day, she found the paper and told me she didn’t like what it said – and said she must have printed it by mistake.”

The teacher also told Sommer that her son was not supposed to take the Nation of Islam handout home. It was supposed to stay in the classroom. That bit of news caused her great alarm.

Ms. Bauer said she is still waiting for the results of a promised investigation by the principal, but Fox reporter Todd Starnes managed to get a comment from the district superintendent.

“My goodness, that we would promote bigoted or racist points of view – merciful heavens,” Superintendent EC Alexander said. “I can assure you that is not the case.”

But Alexander offered a different version of events from the school’s, saying that the handout was “never meant for public distribution” and that Bauer’s son “took the handout from the teacher’s work station without her permission.”

Read the full article.

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Last Thursday evening to help celebrate North Carolina State’s fifth-annual Diversity Education Week, Shakti Butler spoke to participants about challenging the “diversity status quo.”

Dr. Butler is the founder of World Trust, “a foundation that works to eliminate social and racial injustice through transformational education.”

The NC State Technician reports:

Butler’s speech, titled Cracking the Codes: Systems of Inequity, was part of the Fall Diversity Dialogue. Throughout her speech, Butler showed videos, posed questions and encouraged audience discussion about the importance of promoting racial equality.

Butler used collective understanding and strengths to approach developing solutions for pressing problems in the world today.

Transformative learning is all about understanding people’s deeply embedded assumptions about how they think the world really works and unearthing those assumptions to make appropriate changes, Butler said.

“We are born into a system we did not create,” Butler said. “We’ve stepped into a history we did not create. And, most importantly, we have a responsibility to use our collective gifts to create a racially and socially equal world that we want our children’s children to experience.”

Here’s how Butler’s World Trust describes “Transformative Learning”:

Transformative learning is a form of adult education involving experiences that result in a deep, structural shift in thoughts and feelings, which then inform one’s actions. This shift in consciousness can be very subtle or quite extraordinary. Often, it alters our way of making meaning and being in the world. Such a deep-seated shift involves our understanding and our relationships with other people, the natural world, and ourselves.

Butler received a lot of attention back in 2007 when her materials served as the basis for the University of Delaware’s so-called “Residence Life” program. The main concern of that program was that it was mandatory, and involved asking students very invasive questions. (See here, also.)

Butler was reportedly “stunned” by the negative reaction to the UD program, saying “I’ve never had this kind of reaction,” and “I call this reaction totally reactionary and designed to create a deep divide among people, which is the antithesis of what I’m trying to do.”

Dr. Butler’s PhD is from the School of Transformative Learning and Change at the California Institute of Integral Studies. She says the fact that she is multi-racial — African, Arawak Indian and Russian-Jewish — gives her “credibility.”

Read the full Technician article.

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Since the launch of Obamacare, at least 122 colleges and universities across the nation have cut student and faculty work hours to skirt the federal law’s mandate requiring employers to provide healthcare for people who work 30 hours or more per week.

Those who have seen their paychecks shrink as a result of the Affordable Care Act include students who work on campus at restaurants, bookstores or gyms, teaching assistants, Residence Advisers, officer workers, student journalists, and a variety of other workers, such as part-time maintenance crews and groundskeepers. Educators’ work hours have also been cut due to the mandate, including part-time instructors and adjunct professors.

A long and growing list of 450 companies, school districts, colleges and institutions that have slashed and capped work hours to comply with the employer mandate – which goes into effect next year – has been compiled by Jed Graham of Investor’s Business Daily, whose tally chronicles employers both public and private.

With permission from Graham, The College Fix extracted the colleges and universities currently cited on his list to create a unique tally that shows the impact of Obamacare on campuses nationwide.

The College Fix will continue to add to this list each time we learn of a new campus affected by the federal law, an expected turn of events when the employer mandate kicks in. Please alert The College Fix of campuses forced to cut hours because of Obamacare.

Please also see our corresponding article detailing the ramifications of these cuts by University of Michigan student Derek Draplin, a College Fix reporter who interviewed Graham and others about the law’s negative impacts. Graham noted the list is a conservative – not comprehensive – tally.

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES HIT BY OBAMACARE:

1. Middle Tennessee State University – Capped work hours for students, adjunct faculty, graduate assistants and resident assistants

2. North Carolina State UniversityCapped student work hours and adjunct hours

3. Kansas UniversityCapped student work hours at 29 per week

4. Southern Polytechnic State University (Georgia) – Capped student work hours at 20 and capped adjunct hours

5. McNeese State University (Louisiana) – Capped student work hours at 29 per week

6. University of Colorado – Colorado Springs –  Capped student work hours at 25 per week

7. Wright State University (Ohio) – Capped student work hours at 28 per week

8. Georgia Institute of TechnologyCapped student and temp employee work hours at 25 per week and capped adjunct hours

9. Cinncinatti State Technical & Community CollegeCapped hours for part-timers and hours for adjuncts

10. Technical College System of GeorgiaCapped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

11. South Dakota State UniversityCapped student work hours at 29 per week

12. Arkansas Tech UniversityCapped student work hours at 28 per week

13. Kennesaw State University (Georgia) – Capped teaching loads for part-time faculty

14. Butler Community College (Kansas) – Capped hours for students and part time workers at 28 per week and cut adjunct hours

15. Lakeland College (Wisconsin) – Capped summer work hours for students at 29 per week

16. Colorado Mountain CollegeCapped hours of adjunct faculty at 29 per week

17. Grand Rapids Community College (Michigan) – Capped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

18. Mississippi State UniversityCapped hours for student workers at 28 per week

19. La Sierra University (California) – Capped student work hours at 25 per week

20. El Paso Community College (Texas) – Capped teaching loads for part-time faculty

21. University of Northern IowaPlanned cap to student work hours at 20 per week

22. Lone Star College SystemCapped teaching-load for part-time faculty

23. Western Michigan UniversityCapped student work hours at 25 per week

24. St. Edward’s University (Texas) – Capped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

25. Christendom University (Virginia) – Capped hours for students at 29 per week

26. Flathead Valley Community College (Montana) – Capped adjunct faculty teaching hours

27. Penn State UniversityCapped campus work hours, capped adjunct teaching loads

28. University of Central MissouriCapped hours for part-time workers and adjuncts at 29 per week

29. Murray State University (Kentucky) – Capped adjunct teaching loads

30. University of San FranciscoCapped student work hours at 20 per week

31. Carroll Community College (Maryland) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

32. Community College of Baltimore County (Maryland) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

33. Clemson University (South Carolina) – Capped student workers at 28 hours per week

34. Oakton Community College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty hours at 27 per week

35. Biola University (California) – Planned cap to student work hours at 25 per week

36. Sam Houston State University (Texas) – Capped student work hours at 29 per week

37. Eastern Florida State CollegeCapped hours of part-time employees at 28 per week

38. Mid-Plains Community College (Nebraska) – Capped hours of adjunct faculty, other workers at 28 per week

39. Arizona State UniversityCapped hours of associate faculty members

40. Finger Lakes Community College (New York) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

41. Southern Illinois UniversityCapped graduate teaching assistants at 20 hours per week

42. Georgia Military CollegeCapped hours of adjunct faculty to 29 per week

43. Ball State University (Indiana) – Capped work hours for graduate assistants

44. Forsyth Technical Community College (North Carolina) – Capped hours for adjunct faculty at 29 per week

45. Wilkes Community College (North Carolina) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

46. Philadelphia UniversityCapped hours for adjunct faculty at 29 per week

47. Three Rivers CollegeCapped teaching loads for adjunct faculty

48. Bergen Community College (New Jersey) – Capped adjunct faculty hours

49. Ozarks Technical Community College (Missouri) – Capped part-time faculty work hours at 24 per week

50. University of AlabamaCapped student work hours at 20 per week

51. Hillsborough Community College (Florida) – Capped part-time faculty work hours

52. St. Petersburgh College (Florida) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 27 per week

53. Central Michigan UniversityCapped student work hours at 25 per week

54. University of North AlabamaCapped student work hours at 29 per week

55. Pulaski Technical CollegeCapped work hours for adjunct faculty

56. San Diego Community College DistrictCapped student work hours at 25 per week

57. Drury University (Missouri) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours

58. Cumberland University (Tennessee) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 27 per week

59. Auburn University (Alabama) – Capped student work hours at 20 per week

60. Palm Beach State College (Florida) – Capped hours for 100 part-time faculty at 27.5 per week

61. Santa Fe College (Florida) – Capped part-time faculty hours at 27.5 per week

62. Tallahassee Community College (Florida) – Capped part-time work hours at 24 per week

63. Parkland College (Illinois) – Capped hours for part-time, non-teaching workers at 27.5 per week

64. Indiana UniversityCapped hours for part-timers at 29 per week

65. Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty at 29 per week

66. Howard Community College (Maryland) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty

67. Spartanburg Community College (South Carolina) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

68. Southern Utah UniversityCapped student work hours at 20 per week and capped adjunct teaching loads

69. Arkansas State UniversityCapped student, adjunct faculty, and part-time work hours at 28 per week

70. Texas Christian UniversityCapped student, adjunct faculty, and part-time work hours at 29 per week

71. Des Moines Area CommunityCollege Capped sadjunct faculty summer hours

72. Maricopa Community Colleges (Arizona) – Capped adjunct faculty and part-time work hours at 29 per week

73. University of ArizonaCapped work hours for temporary employees

74. College of DuPage (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty course loads

75. McHenry County College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 24 per week

76. Sinclair Community College (Ohio) – Capped part-time work hours at 28 per week and cut adjunct faculty hours

77. Dallas County Community College DistrictCapped adjunct faculty work hours

78. New Mexico State UniversityCapped graduate-student work hours at 25 per week

79. Blue Ridge Community and Technical College (West Virginia) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

80. Ohio State UniversityCapped student work hours at 28 per week

81. Ohio UniversityCapped student and graduate assistant work hours at 28 hours of work per week during summer

82. Union County College (New Jersey) – Capped adjunct faculty teaching loads

83. Daytona State College (Florida) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty

84. Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois) – Capped course loads for adjunct faculty

85. Kalamazoo Valley Community College (Michigan) – Capped part-time faculty work hours

86. St. Clair Community College (Michigan) – Capped adjunct professors and part-time work hours at 29 per week

87. Moberly Area Community College (Missouri) – Capped adjunct faculty course loads

88. Community College System of New HampshireCapped adjunct faculty work hours at 27 per week

89. Cuyahoga Community College (Ohio) – Capped part-time work hours at 20 per week

90. University of Akron (Ohio) – Capped course loads for part-time faculty

91. Brigham Young University (Utah) – Capped work hours for students and part-time workers at 29 per week

92. Elmhurst College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct teaching load at one course per semester

93. Columbus State Community College (Ohio) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

94. Joliet Junior College (Illinois) – Capped adjunct faculty course loads

95. Hudson Valley Community College (New York) – Capped part-time faculty work hours

96. Baldwin-Wallace University (Ohio) – Capped course load of adjunct faculty

97. Kent State University (Ohio) – Capped course load of adjunct faculty

98. Lakeland Community College (Ohio) – Capped course load of adjunct faculty

99. Bowling Green State University (Ohio) – Capped part-time work hours at 24 per week and student work hours at 28

100. Shawnee State University (Ohio) – Capped teaching hours for adjunct faculty

101. Virginia TechCapped work hours for part-timer and adjunct faculty at 29 per week

102. Miami Dade College (Florida) – Capped part-time work hours at 25 per week

103. Christopher Newport University (Virginia) – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

104. College of William & Mary (Virginia) – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

105. Norfolk State University (Virginia) – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

106. Virginia Commonwealth University – Capped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

107. Virginia Community College SystemCapped part-time and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

108. George Mason University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

109. James Madison University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

110. Longwood University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

111. Old Dominion University (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

112. Radford University (Virginia) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty

113. University of Mary Washington (Virginia) – Capped student and adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

114. Utah Valley UniversityCapped part-time workers at 28 hours per week and capped adjunct teaching loads

115. Illinois Valley Community CollegeCapped part-time work hours at 29 per week

116. Rock Valley College (Illinois) – Capped part-time work hours at 25 per week

117. Chesapeake College (Maryland) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 28 per week

118. Kean University (New Jersey) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours

119. Stark State College (Ohio) – Capped adjunct faculty work hours at 29 per week

120. Youngstown State University (Ohio) – Capped work hours of part-time and adjunct faculty

121. Community College of Allegheny College (Pennsylvania) – Capped work hours for adjunct faculty and other part-time workers

122. University of Colorado, BoulderCapped student work hours at 25 per week

Please contact us for additions or corrections.

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College Fix reporter Derek Draplin, a student at the University of Michigan, helped compile this report.

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It already has gender-neutral bathrooms; now the Toronto School District is hosting several conferences devoted to LGBTQ issues … at the middle school level.

Truth Revolt reports:

The “conferences,” sponsored by Jer’s Vision, will have much LGBTQ promotional materials for the little ones to absorb, such as workshops relating to two-spirit and LGBTQ advocacy for the secondary school students and workshops on Gay pride for middle-school students. Both teachers and students will be given “instruction” on advocating for all gender bathrooms, which will be taught by David Stocker, the teacher who successfully implemented an all-gender bathroom at a middle-school in Toronto.

According to the schedule, the young teens “will take in a drag performance,” be educated on “transgender, non-binary, two-spirit, and asexual identities,” and “learn about ‘decolonizing gender.'”

Read the full article.

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More details have emerged about one of the largest cheating scandals involving collegiate athletes is U.S. history thanks to a new investigative report released Wednesday.

University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill had concocted a massive system to keep student athletes eligible to play, a set-up described by the News & Observer as an 18-year scheme that included bogus classes, inflated grades and a “shadow curriculum” advanced by those in charge.

Everyone from coaches to academic counselors to a top official at the African and Afro-American Studies department were complicit in the scheme.

The N&O reports:

The system of no-show classes at UNC-Chapel Hill was pushed by academic counselors for athletes, hatched and enabled by two sympathetic officials in a key department and employed by coaches eager to keep players eligible, a new report into the long-running scandal has found.

The 18-year scheme generated inflated grades through lecture-style classes that had been quietly converted into bogus independent studies. The report, released Wednesday afternoon, found a new culprit: the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes.

[The report] found that the academic counselors had pushed for the easy classes and embraced those started by Deborah Crowder, a longtime manager for the Department of African and Afro-American Studies. The report describes a fairly broad group of academic and athletic officials who knew about athletes getting better grades in classes that only required papers, yet taking little or no action.

As The College Fix has previously reported, UNC Chapel Hill students have known for quite some time that athletes were pointed to easy-A classes. Also, details on just how bad the set-up really was has come out in recent years.

In 2012, The College Fix reported on the appalling lack of academic standards that had been revealed within the University of North Carolina’s African and Afro-American Studies department. There was a rampant use of so-called “no-show” classes, where professors weren’t even showing up for classes, and were simply giving students phony grades. There was almost no accountability, despite widespread neglect and corruption. No one, it seems, wanted to question what was going on within the department.

Wednesday’s report suggests many employees knew about the situation, as the News and Observer reports:

It was common knowledge within the support program that the classes didn’t meet, were easy and offered high grades, the report says. They became such a crutch that when Crowder retired in 2009, football team counselors were desperate for the classes to continue, warning coaches the team’s overall GPA would plummet, which it did.

But some in the program knew that the classes, which typically required a term paper at the end, lacked a professor. Crowder played that role, even though she only had a bachelor’s degree from UNC. She created the classes – often at the counselors’ requests – collected the papers and graded them, often without reading them, the report said.

What adminsitrators knew, and when they knew it, is a different story:

“We found no evidence that the higher levels of the University tried in any way to obscure the facts or the magnitude of this situation,” the report said. “To the extent there were times of delay or equivocation in their response to this controversy, we largely attribute that to insufficient appreciation of the scale of the problem, an understandable lack of experience with this sort of institutional crisis and some lingering disbelief that such misconduct could have occurred at Chapel Hill.”

Read the full article.

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