S&M

The taxpayer-funded Planned Parenthood is corrupting America’s young people, and one nonprofit is dedicated to exposing just how insidious and outlandish their “sex ed” has become.

The Daily Caller reports:

Planned Parenthood sex counselors happily promote BDSM and other violent sexual practices to minors, according to an upcoming Live Action investigation.

Live Action sent actresses with hidden cameras to clinics in states across the country posing as girls under 18 to ask counselors for sex advice.

In the soon-to-be released series of videos, Live Action documented counselors encouraging girls as young as fifteen to use whips, handcuffs, gags, bondage, dominatrix-play and even asphyxiation — deprivation of oxygen — during sex. The age of consent in the United States is 16 or older, depending on the state.

The trailer also shows counselors advising these girls that pain and injury during sex is acceptable and normal.

If this is what the trailer shows, it’s scary to think what the next series of videos will reveal. This is the second time a Live Action undercover investigation has revealed shocking truths about Planned Parenthood.

Watch the trailer:

 

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I recently gave a talk about my new book, Sex & God at Yale, at Hillsdale College–a really special institution in rural Michigan that teaches its students to think critically about the truth and avoids the liberal indoctrination so rampant at most other colleges.

Hillsdale publishes a very popular monthly newsletter, Imprimis, which reaches more than two million readers. They were kind enough to publish an article in this month’s edition, based on the talk I gave at the school back in October. Here’s an excerpt from the article:

IN 1951, William F. Buckley, Jr., a graduate of Yale the year before, published his first book, God & Man at Yale. In the preface, he described two ideas that he had brought with him to Yale and that governed his view of the world:

“I had always been taught, and experience had fortified the teachings, that an active faith in God and a rigid adherence to Christian principles are the most powerful influences toward the good life. I also believed, with only a scanty knowledge of economics, that free enterprise and limited government had served this country well and would probably continue to do so in the future.”

The body of the book provided evidence that the academic agenda at Yale was openly antagonistic to those two ideas—that Buckley had encountered a teaching and a culture that were hostile to religious faith and that promoted collectivism over free market individualism. Rather than functioning as an open forum for ideas, his book argued, Yale was waging open war upon the faith and principles of its alumni and parents.

Liberal bias at American colleges and universities is something we hear a lot about today. At the time, however, Buckley’s exposé was something new, and it stirred national controversy. The university counterattacked, and Yale trustee Frank Ashburn lambasted Buckley and his book in the pages of Saturday Review magazine.

Whether God & Man at Yale had any effect on Yale’s curriculum is debatable, but its impact on American political history is indisputable. It argued for a connection between the cause of religious faith on the one hand, and the cause of free market economics on the other. In a passage whose precise wording was later acknowledged to have been the work of Buckley’s mentor Willmoore Kendall—a conservative political scientist who was driven out of Yale a few years later—Buckley wrote:

“I consider this battle of educational theory important and worth time and thought even in the context of a world situation that seems to render totally irrelevant any fight except the power struggle against Communism. I myself believe that the duel between Christianity and atheism is the most important in the world. I further believe that the struggle between individualism and collectivism is the same struggle reproduced on another level.”

This idea, later promoted as “fusionism” in Buckley’s influential magazine National Review, would become the germ of the Reagan coalition that united social conservatives and free market libertarians—a once-winning coalition that has been lately unraveling.

I graduated from Yale in 2009, fifty-nine years after Buckley. I had a chance to meet him a couple of years before his death, at a small gathering at the home of a professor. Little did I know at the time that I would write a book of my own that would serve, in some ways, as a continuation of his famous critique.

My book—which I entitled Sex and God at Yale—shows that Yale’s liberals are still actively working to refashion American politics and culture. But the devil is in the details, and it’s safe to say that there are things happening at Yale today that Buckley could scarcely have even imagined in 1951. While the Yale of Buckley’s book marginalized or undermined religious faith in the classroom, my book tells of a classmate who was given approval to create an art object out of what she claimed was blood and tissue from self-induced abortions. And while the Yale of Buckley’s book was promoting socialist ideas in its economics department, my book chronicles Yale’s recent employment of a professor who publicly praised terrorist organizations such as Hamas and Hezbollah.

My, how times have changed!

There is clearly a radical sexual agenda at work at Yale today. Professors and administrators who came of age during the sexual revolution are busily indoctrinating students into a culture of promiscuity. In fact, Yale pioneered the hosting of a campus “Sex Week”—a festival of sleaze, porn, and debauchery, dressed up as sex education. I encountered this tawdry tradition as an undergrad, and my book documents the events of Sex Week, including the screening in classrooms of hard-core pornography and the giving of permission to sex toy manufacturers and porn production companies to market their products to students.

In one classroom, a porn star stripped down to bare breasts, attached pinching and binding devices to herself as a lesson in sadomasochism, and led a student around the room in handcuffs. On other occasions, female students competed in a porn star look-alike contest judged by a male porn producer, and a porn film showing a woman bound and beaten was screened in the context of “instruction” on how students might engage in relationships of their own…

For the full article and to check out Imprimis, visit this link.

Or, better yet, buy the book!

 

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Via Campus Reform:

Harvard University granted a controversial BDSM sex-club official school recognition on Wednesday, Campus Reform has confirmed.

The student club, Harvard College Munch, is a group of roughly 20 members that meets weekly to explicitly discuss matters related to BDSM and other forms of kinky sex.

School recognition will allow the club to apply for university funding and promote their group on school property, reports Harvard’s student newspaper, The Crimson

In an article published earlier this year, students in the group spoke freely about fantasies of rape, forced feeding, and impersonating animals during sex…

Read the full story here.

If you ask us, it sounds like Harvard is behind the curve here. After all, this kind of stuff has been going on at Yale for years.

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