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George Mason professors object to renaming law school after Scalia

George Mason University professors are upset at their institution’s plan to rename its law school after the late Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia, calling him divisive, suggesting he was a bigot, and complaining that the name will brand the school as conservative, among other grievances in a recently approved resolution.

What’s more, Inside Higher Ed reports that while the resolution did not formally oppose the Scalia name, such a proposal is expected to be introduced at the senate’s next meeting.

The university’s faculty senate on Wednesday voted 21-13 to approve a resolution that stated in part they have “deep concern” over the renaming plans, and that the following is “problematic”:

The celebration of a Supreme Court Justice who made numerous public offensive comments about various groups – including people of color, women, and LGBTQ individuals – which this university has appropriately gone to some lengths to embrace as valued parts of the university community;

The memorializing of a Supreme Court Justice who was a significant contributor to the polarized climate in this country that runs counter to the values of a university that celebrates civil discourse;

The reinforcement of the external branding of the university as a conservative institution rather than an unaligned body that is a comfortable home for individuals with a variety of viewpoints …

The resolution also bemoans the fact that details on the $30 million donation behind the name change have been largely kept secret, and questions how additional faculty will be paid once the funding runs out.

RELATED: George Mason University renames law school after Antonin Scalia

RELATED: U. Chicago Law School grads say Antonin Scalia was ‘racist’ for giving them low grades

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About the Author
Fix Editor
Jennifer Kabbany is editor of The College Fix. She previously worked as a daily newspaper reporter and columnist for a decade in Southern California, and prior to that held editorial positions at The Weekly Standard, Washington Times and FrontPageMagazine. She is also a Robert Novak Journalism Fellowship recipient and has contributed to National Review.

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